How to Contact Leads

How to Contact Leads

This article is part of our three step guide on lead generation basics. For this step, which is the third and final step of lead generation, we discuss how to contact leads. This is arguably the most important step, which can be anything from marketing automation to personal contact, because it’s where the beginning of a sale truly begins to take shape.

A quick recap of what we previously talked about:

In the first step, we talked about what a lead and lead hacking is, in the second step we outlined the process of lead qualification, and now we will share the best practices of lead contacting.

What do you do once you’ve identified a lead?

This article is about what to do once you’ve identified a lead. While there is no absolute answer to this, there are few things you should be considering to make the strongest introduction possible.

The items you should be considering include:

  1. Lead name (a person or company)
  2. Contact details
  3. Subject matter

You will need 1 and 2 (pre-conditions) in order to make contact and talk (step 3).

Customer example question:

“I have a question regarding on how to follow up on possible leads. What if I notice a company is coming back regularly to check out our services, how can I best contact this company? Mail, phone? I don’t want to look like a stalker. Is there any proven strategy or best practices on this subject?”

Much depends on your company’s sales workflow. Is your product high-end – with service contracts, or are you targeting SME (small and medium enterprise) clients. How long is your sales cycle, do you provide a demo, do you have a dedicated sales team to contact leads, etc. These parameters will define the structure of the dialogue.

In some cases the lead will get in touch with you, and in some cases you will be initiating contact. Lead generation software (keeping track of potential clients) helps in both scenarios because you can see what your lead is doing (what they are interested in) and their level of interest. “Strike while the iron is hot”.

Once you have contact points and subject matter, you should make contact. Try a combination of both telephone and email. Telephone takes more energy, and is more effective when you actually get to speak to the right person. We’ve learned that a combination of both telephone and email works best.

We’ve also learned that, in terms of best practices, you want to make an initial call (or email) that is short and sweet. Narrow the conversation down to a single deliverable, if possible.

Important: once you make a promise, any promise, no matter how small – make sure you absolutely 100% follow-up. This is trust-building.

How can LeadBoxer help you to contact leads.

LeadBoxer, or any other lead generation software, automates the process of determining who to call and/or email. Many established B2B sites receive hundreds or even thousands of visitors (potential leads) on a weekly basis. Time is often of the essence here. It is not humanly possible to screen all traffic, although it may be a good idea to have different people sort traffic, and do the actual contacting. This is where the software comes is. By “qualification” we mean an automated system for sorting potential leads and ranking them based on qualifying metrics. Allowing you to contact leads which you might have otherwise missed.

How to contact leads with LinkedIn

How to contact leads with LinkedIn

What can you do with leads identified by LeadBoxer?

Scenario: you have installed the LeadBoxer lead pixel into your website. A few days later, you have a list of companies who are interested in your products and services. You are not 100% convinced that you want to call them up and say “Hey, I saw you clicking around on our website, what’s up?” One solution would be to contact leads with LinkedIn.

People are looking for specific information. Therefore, if you can help them get the information that they need, you are helping them, not bugging them.

In this case, we recommend an indirect approach as you can see below.

Best Practises

1. Targeting When you see that a company has visited your website, target them through LinkedIn
(obviously, you can use any alternative to LinkedIn – which is just the example given here).

2. Strategy The strategy is to know that a company is interested – and give them information that makes them aware of your services. Keep in mind that if a lead is actively looking for a solution to their problem, they will appreciate good information.
Note: surfing behavior is Goal-Oriented. People do not visit (B2B) websites because they are curious as to what they look like. People are looking for specific information. Therefore, if you can help them get the information that they need, you are helping them.

3. Use lead/visitor activity – meaning clickstreams; to know what your leads are actually interested in and speak to the content/ subject-matter of the pages they visited. In other words, use a prominent bit of the text on the pages visited in the subject heading of your communication.

4. Locating decision-makers – (for example) if you product/ service is related to staffing, find the person(s) responsible for Human Resources.
Note: locate the company on LinkedIn and then you research who is responsible for Human Resources, etc.

5. Advertise –  You can then advertise via LinkedIn in order to post content on that person/ company’s LinkedIn personal feed.
Click here for a blog post we wrote on LinkedIn advertising.

So how do I contact leads with LinkedIn

Step-by-step

a) Locate the company identified by LeadBoxer on LinkedIn
b) Find the person or persons responsible for the problem you solve
c) Send a LinkedIn invite request
d) OR use Chrome extension called (email) Hunter – to locate their email address and email them
e) OR send relevant materials via LinkedIn advertising (see above)

Happy Hunting!

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